THINGS TO DO

The Olympic National Park within the Olympic Peninsula is a designated World Heritage site by UNESCO. The area includes over 62 miles of wilderness coastline, the longest undeveloped coast in the contiguous United States!

 

There are so many things to see and do during your trip to the Olympic Peninsula. 

 

Use Virago Camp as your home base to explore the area in detail: hike to glacier peaks, experience alpine meadows, break out your binoculars to catch eagles, kingfishers, or barred owls, bike rugged trails, explore tide pools filled with starfish and sea anemones, or brave the chilly waters of the Pacific to catch a few waves.

 

For a more restful day, head into the timber town of Forks, Washington to get your fill of Twilight-related tours and merchandise, learn about the logging industry at the Forks Timber Museum, or travel a bit further to visit the Makah Cultural & Research Center at Neah Bay to learn about the First People of the Pacific Northwest.

RP7
BarredOwlCrop2
I'm an image title
Swimming
Steelheadcrop2
Washinton State Park, Washington - Septe
 
ONSITE GAMES

Virago Camp has a TOY BOX with activities and games.

Birdwatch Bingo: Take a laminated sheet when you arrive and play during your whole stay. 

Jumbo Jenga: The classic game, enlarged! (Link to DIY.)

Kubb: (pronounced "KOOB") is a Swedish lawn game. Kubb can be described as a combination of bowling and horseshoes.  3-minute video explaining the rules. (Link to DIY.)

 
SWIMMING

The Virago Camp is home to a very popular local swim hole located under the Highway 101 bridge but it is not the only opportunity to swim! The peninsula is filled with lakes, rivers, and the ocean. Be careful! Rivers can be swift and riptides can pull you out to sea quickly.

 
BIRD WATCHING

Dig out those binoculars! The Olympic Peninsula is home to over 300 species of birds. You can spot at least 18 species of birds at Virago Camp alone.

Laminated Bird Bingo Cards are located in the communal Toy Box at Virago Camp. (printable version)

Audubon - Olympic National Park 

 
BIKING

Both road and mountain biking adventures await you! Check out the Olympic Peninsula Bicycle Alliance for recommendations, group rides, and more. 

Olympic Peninsula Bicycle Alliance

 
HUNTING

Hunting is a popular activity on the Olympic Peninsula. When done responsibly, hunting helps maintain healthy populations of animals and provides food for families. Make sure you know what game is in season and what hunting methods are open. You'll need a license, and the necessary tags, permits, or stamps. There are seasons for Deer, Elk, Cougar, Bear, Game birds, Wild Turkeys, and more!

Hunting Seasons

Hunting Regulations

Licensing Information

 
TWILIGHT

No trip to Forks would be complete without indulging the Twilight Craze. After the first book was published, the town found itself inundated with teenagers (and their moms and dads) keen on finding their own sparkling vampire. You can get a picture with Bella’s truck (both the book and movie version), and take a self-guided tour of the book and movie locations.

Self-Guided Twilight Tour

 
FIRST PEOPLES HISTORY

The Olympic Peninsula’s original residents arrived over 12,000 years ago. Today, many tribes call the area home: Makah, Quileute, Queets, Hoh, Quinault, Skokomish, Port Gamble S’Klallam, Jamestown S’Klallan, and Lower Elwha Klallam.

Indian Country Etiquette

Quileute Language

Makah Cultural & Research Center

Hoh Tribe Cultural Information

Quinault Cultural Center

 
HIKING

There are over 89 hard trails in the Olympic National Park ranging from 1.5 to 98.9 miles, easy to expert. 

Check out these 10 Great Day Hikes

Ruby Beach Hike

WTA Hiking Guide

 
FISHING

The Bogachiel River is considered a prime fishing river. Steelhead and salmon navigate the waters. But don’t limit yourself to just the Boggy. Hire a local guide and get the true Olympic Peninsula fishing experience. Remember to get a fishing license! 

Fishing License Information

Hire a Local Fishing Guide

Shellfishing Regulations

 
BEACHCOMBING

Beachcombing is in the Virago Camp owner’s family blood. Grandma Quick roamed the empty beaches in the 1950s even fending off a bear one time. She found all sorts of treasures including handblown Japanese glass floats. What will you find as you explore? Check the tide tables so you can time your exploring at low tide when the tidal pools are exposed. See starfish, sea anemones, crabs, and all sorts of other marine life.

Tide Schedule

Tidepool Activities

 
SURFING

Ruby Beach is 25 minutes south of Virago Camp. If you’re brave enough to don your wetsuit and paddle out into the low 50’s degree water, then a surfing adventure can be yours! Remember to stock up on your firewood so you can warm up back at camp.

Ruby Beach Surf Report

Our Address

180 Smith Road

Forks, WA 98331

Contact Us

Book Reservations on

Follow Us

  • Instagram
  • LinkedIn

© 2020 by VIRAGO RETREAT CENTER, LLC

Swimming